Dying Well. Dying Well Free Summary by Ira Byock MD 2019-01-24

Dying Well Rating: 8,5/10 1144 reviews

Living Well, Dying Well

Dying Well

The hardest story in this book to read, but the most rewarding, was that of 8 year old Michael Merseal, being cared for at home by his dedicated single father, and an equally dedicated hospice team. His goal is to document the human capacity to experience meaning, value, transformation, even joy within the process of illness and dying. This is one of the most moving and thoughtful books about this subject I''ve come across. This entry was posted in on by. The terms palliative care and hospice care both refer to this kind of medical care. Dying well My husband has terminal cancer.


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Dying Well

Dying Well

I appreciated some of the questions Byock chose to ask people who were dying, including: what would make the rest of your life the best it could be? Have you said your good-byes? There is also work to be completed outside of the class environment. That never made sense to me, because, if you think about it, people who are dying are the sickest people in our healthcare system. Byock, who argues that the euthanasia debate has distracted our attention from more logical and humane approaches, is not afraid to give his considered opinions about assisted suicide, vegetative states, and feeding tubes. At one time or another, she exemplified almost every trait associated with the typical caricature of a churlish woman. The author is a pioneer in the field of community-wide hospice. Ultimately, this book was incredibly healing for me as a person going through these types of experiences. Dying well, means living life well.

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Dying Well Free Summary by Ira Byock MD

Dying Well

It is best to avoid unnecessary trips by the patient to the hospital. The stories here not only reveal the palliative team's way of handling the medical aspects of these patients, but, more importantly their spiritual well-being, or their well-being within as they complete their life's sto Written by a hospice doctor who has dedicated much of his life to palliative care, this book recounts about 10 end-of-life stories of Dr. Since then it has remained the gold standard of books teaching us how to live deeply to the end. On the 20th anniversary of Dying Well, we find ourselves with a long way still to go, making its lessons as relevant today as they were at first publication. I picked this book up at the library by happenstance, and I'm so glad I did. Their focus tends to be on the future and doing all they can to improve it. The class is also designed to assist the participants to identify their spiritual blocks and find a way through them to ultimately move to forgiveness of self and others.

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Dying Well Course: Exploring the Spirituality of Dying

Dying Well

Byock opens the conversation with such beautiful anecdotes of love, compassion, and peace during the dying process that one almost cannot help but be inspired. She is an ordained elder in the United Methodist Church as well as a spiritual director, clergy coach, church consultant and conflict mediator. He would himself be buried in this same plot thirty-eight years later, as would Isaac and Rebekah Gen. If this whole art thing doesn't work out, I've been toying with the idea of going back to school to be involved in hospice in some sort of way. During that time of caring for him I did a lot of reading.

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Dying Well by Ira Byock

Dying Well

Conclusion, everyone should read it! Each story he details is uplifting, and ends on a positive note. Byock explains how different people die. We see opportunities for dying well and faithfully, real-world examples of personal growth and instances of reconciliation and personal healing in relationships. Thrilling and daunting too, I realize, but far better than the alternative! I chose this book because I am now in palliative care for metastatic breast cancer; I'm not at that point yet where I need hospice care, but learning as much as I can about the death and dying process helps me to fear it less. What is crystal clear in all of them is that the full experience of dying is not captured from a purely medical perspective. While lacking in nuance in some ways, Byock does a decent job of story telling through these several vignettes.

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Dying Well by Ira Byock

Dying Well

Byock opens the conversation with such beautiful anecdotes of love, compassion, and peace during the dying process that one almost cannot help but be inspired. I highly recommend this book to anyone facing a terminal illness, and those who may have to deal with the terminal illness of a family member or friend. Regardless of what disease they have, their age, color of their , ethnicity, or religion, it turns out, first and foremost, people matter to one another. S arah lived 127 years…. These are the important questions we should all ask as we go through this process of death. Gutkind's book contains essays written by 24 different people - giving individual perspectives. It was a difficult book to finish because it tugged on my emotions, especially as I've begun hospice patient volunteer work.

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DYING WELL by Ira Byock

Dying Well

I would have benefited from this if I had been presented it before mom died. In this book, he describes multiple different cases he's been involved with of people dying and how they spent their last days. This is a good book and a necessary one to read. Byock is a wonderfully gifted writer who interweaves not only the medical An incredibly beautiful and moving book. I don't know how often I can say this for other books, but this book truly came into my life at just the right time. It helped assuage my fears and discomforts, and provided me more information than a Google search could have provided me with. End of Life American society lacks a constructive vision of end-of-life issues or care.


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On Dying Well

Dying Well

Here in our society, especially if you are poor, or of color, have mental illness, you are at-risk. I read a few chapters each night and always end up bawling-- and a fair amount of tears are for the people featured in the book. This aversion to death, an event that is basic to all life and is completely natural, amplifies our everyday fears and may cause us to shun people with illnesses and create innocent pariahs when they need us the most. There are people we love whom we bury. Such patients can choose a feeding tube or choose to simply stop eating and drinking and die peacefully. I am thankful for the sharing and intimacy. If things progress, get more than two opinions and make sure one is with a palliative-care team.


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Dying Well by Ira Byock

Dying Well

Sarah and Abraham had been married fifty-two years. Was there anything else we should have done? Eleven years into their marriage, still childless, Abraham was eighty-six and took another wife, Hagar Gen. This book will change your life and teach you to life more everyday. Often reminiscent of Michael Kearney's recent Mortally Wounded p. The clients and families love the students and they are creating a large impact. . Ten years of childlessness, and at seventy-five, desperation led her to do the unthinkable — suggest to her husband that he take her mistress, Hagar, as a second wife and bear him children Ishmael.


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