Riding to win. We Need to Talk About Riding to Win vs. Chasing Perfection 2019-01-11

Riding to win Rating: 4,3/10 492 reviews

We Need to Talk About Riding to Win vs. Chasing Perfection

Riding to win

Think small steps of improvement and train yourself and your horse in a comfortable environment first before considering applying it in the ring. Preparing for success What I have learned from interviewing some of the most successful riders in showjumping, is that they do exactly that. Similarly, when going for the win, thinking, turning and reacting faster should also be something we train. Simply visualize yourself riding a supersonically fast round. Another possible downside is the slightly addictive nature of winning. But, come to think of it, a blue ribbon would be nice.


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Riding to Win by Bonnie Bryant by Bonnie Bryant

Riding to win

How should we be strategizing our rides? Neil Hiller died in 1989. Pine Hollow featured Carole, Lisa, Stevie, and their new friends in a series set four years after The Saddle Club. Meanwhile, Lisa is facing bigger challenges. In case the fear persists, reach out to a mental coach and work on it together. If you, for example, always chase that beautiful, smooth round and avoid taking risks, this might be a sign you are too focused on perfection and not allowing yourself to make mistakes and, with that, becoming a better rider. Maikel van der Vleuten and Dana Blue. With a more clear focus on being competitive, you increase your chances of victory.

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Riding to Win

Riding to win

How can you ride, train, and prepare to be or become more competitive? What are the upsides and what are the downsides of this approach? Ever wondered what the greats think about before they go into the arena? When is going for it a good idea, when is it worth laying down that fast ride or inside turn? With that shift of focus from the process to results, we quickly lose track of what really matters the most - becoming the best rider you can be, and creating the ultimate teamwork between you and your horse. The paradox of success is that in order to succeed, we must fail often. In equestrian sports, we have an extra thing to think about that most sports don't: working together with a living animal. From my own experience, and from working with many riders, I know we often have a preference for either riding to win, or chasing that 'perfect ride'. In the next few installments of this series, we'll go deeper into each approach - really getting down to the nitty-gritty, uncovering when they're useful, why, and how to figure out what works for you and your horses.


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Riding to Win (Pine Hollow, #9) by Bonnie Bryant

Riding to win

What we have learned so far Aiming to ride a perfect round where horse and rider become one, where every obstacle is taken effortlessly and where the same rhythm flows from start to finish, comes down to great detail and practice. Riding young horses can trigger this mindset, so can comparing yourself to a specific standard of what a 'good' ride is. In the jump-off, however, everything gets faster and often feels a lot less smooth. They will train their horses at home or at a training show, but when the game is on, they are only focused on one thing: victory. Make a clear plan Now that you are aware of your options, take the time to prepare for your next show season. What I have learned from working with my clients, however, is, that when you become more competitive, you start to crave that feeling of victory. Have they ever doubted themselves? How can we learn from failure and adopt a growth mindset?.

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Riding to Win by Bonnie Bryant by Bonnie Bryant

Riding to win

In the first round, you think one smooth rhythm, use your turns to get ready for the next line, and focus on consistency. The Right Time to Go For It So when should we actually dig deep and chase the win? The more detail you use and the more time you spend imagining these razor-sharp turns, the fast pace and the amazing feeling of you and your horse being in perfect sync, the better. Macy , Catherine Hapka, Sallie Bissell, Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Helen Geraghty, Tina deVaron, Cat Johnston, Minna Jung, and Sheila Prescott-Vessey. Many of Bonnie's books are dedicated to him. She spent a lot of time at the equine center, growing her skills and experiences, which provided a sense of direction and a path for her to follow. Communication is Key Riding to win requires a very different mindset than riding a first round or schooling a youngster, for example. I mean, they are all obviously uber-talented, right? Some riders are fiercely competitive and always ride to win.

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Riding To Win

Riding to win

In other words, our ego gets addicted to success pretty quickly. While lusting after the ever illusive 'perfect' round or trying to show that you measure up can be detrimental to your competitive mindset, there's definitely a time and a place for both riding just to work on and improve yourself and your horse, as well as channeling your inner Maria Sharapova and going after the victory. The E-mail message field is required. Bonnie Bryant was born and raised in New York City. She met her husband, Neil W.

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Riding to Win

Riding to win

Bonnie Bryant wrote at least 38 The Saddle Club books and 2 Pine Hollow books herself; after that they were taken over by a team of ghostwriters, a common practice in long-running children's book series. Should we always be focused on training our horses and seeking to ride that elusive perfect round', or are there circumstances when we should actively be seeking victory? Related: In this series there's just too much to fit into one article , let's get real and dive deep into the pros and cons of both approaches so we can all make a more educated - or at least more conscious - decision as to which strategy we should adopt and when. However, you have to be realistic too. On the other hand, when you have established an excellent relationship with your horse over a long period of time, you know each other well and you can more easily judge whether your horse and you are ready. In this installment, we're talking show jumping, and we're talking speed.

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Riding to Win by Bonnie Bryant by Bonnie Bryant

Riding to win

Unlike The Saddle Club, Pine Hollow conformed to a realistic timeline. When attempting to win more often, statistically assuming the circumstances are right , you increase your chances of being placed more often. The series was static in time; the girls never aged in 101 books, 7 special editions, American author of children's books. For each of their horses, they know exactly when they will be working on what. She is best known for creating the intermediate horse book series The Saddle Club, which was published from October 1988 until April 2001.


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Riding to Win

Riding to win

Summary The Pine Hollow riders discover what winning—and losing—is all about The countdown is on for the annual Colesford Horse Show. So when you and your team feel the time is right, consider gradually starting to ride faster and taking measured risks. This is the key difference between the mindset of trying to look good or prove yourself, and using certain rounds to improve, train, and move forward. Meanwhile, Lisa is facing bigger challenges. Personally, I believe that anything we are not good at, we should train until it becomes easier to do and perhaps even our strength. As a performance coach I have realized that the way the riders I work with perceive failure, is a good indication of not only how much they learn, grow and succeed but also how much they enjoy the riding. Same concept, totally different intention.

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Series: Riding to win vs. chasing perfection (Final Blog)

Riding to win

She has accepted a spot at Northern Virginia University, which happens to be just forty miles away from her friends and boyfriend. They had two sons, Emmons Hiller and Andrew Hiller. Riding to win is part of competing too, so instead of riding to avoid mistakes, ride to ride great! Bonnie Bryant also wrote two spin-off series: Pony Tails, aimed at beginning readers, and Pine Hollow, aimed at teenage readers. This way, when we are able to go all in, we know what we can and cannot do, and we have more confidence in our quick thinking and jump-off abilities. What I have learned from interviewing some of the most successful riders in showjumping, is that chasing the podium is something that they have been preparing for long in advance, down to specific decisions they have made leading up to the big day. Instead of depending on circumstances, make sure you prepare your mind before every class with a routine that works well for you.

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